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Ready-to-eat sausages recalled after inspection finds Listeria on production surfaces

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Daniele International LLC, of Mapleville, RI, is recalling 52,914 pounds of ready-to-eat (RTE) sausage products because of Listeria monocytogenes contamination, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announcement.

FSIS discovered the problem during routine inspection activities where Listeria monocytogenes was found on surfaces where the product came into contact. With sell by dates through 2023, FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers.

The ready to eat sausage products were produced on various dates from May 23, 2022, through Nov. 25, 2022, and shipped to retail locations nationwide on various dates from Dec. 23, 2022, through Jan. 17, 2023. 

Recalled products:

  • 6-oz. plastic tray of “FREDERIK’S by meijer SPANISH STYLE charcuterie sampler tray” with sell by date 4/15/23.
  • 6-oz. plastic tray of “Boar’s Head CHARCUTUERIE TRIO” with sell by dates 4/13/23, 4/14/23, and 4/15/23.
  • 7-oz. plastic tray of “COLAMECO’S PRIMO NATURALE GENOA UNCURED SALAMI” with sell by date 12/23/23.
  • 7-oz. plastic tray of “COLAMECO’S PRIMO NATURALE BLACK PEPPER UNCURED SALAMI” with use by dates 12/22/23, 12/30/23, and 1/17/24.
  • 1-lb. plastic tray of “DEL DUCA SOPRESSATA, COPPA & GENOA SALAMI” with sell by dates 4/13/23 and 4/14/23. 
  • 1-lb. plastic tray of “DEL DUCA CALABRESE, PROSCIUTTO & COPPA” with  sell by date 5/6/23.
  • 1-lb. plastic tray of “DEL DUCA GENOA SALAMI, UNCURED PEPPERONI & HARD SALAMI” with use by date 5/4/23.
  • 12-oz. plastic tray of “Gourmet Selection SOPRESSATA, CAPOCOLLO, HARD SALAME” with sell by date 4/14/23.

The products subject to recall have establishment number “EST. 54” printed inside the USDA mark of inspection on this labels. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.                 

As of the posting of the recall, there had been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions related to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.  

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

About Listeria infections
Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections. Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products and developed symptoms of Listeria infection should seek medical treatment and tell their doctors about the possible Listeria exposure.

Also, anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products should monitor themselves for symptoms during the coming weeks because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to Listeria for symptoms of listeriosis to develop. 

Symptoms of Listeria infection can include vomiting, nausea, persistent fever, muscle aches, severe headache, and neck stiffness. Specific laboratory tests are required to diagnose Listeria infections, which can mimic other illnesses. 

Pregnant women, the elderly, young children, and people such as cancer patients who have weakened immune systems are particularly at risk of serious illnesses, life-threatening infections, and other complications. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, their infections can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

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