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Salmonella infections linked to peas sold at farmers markets in Wisconsin


The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, in collaboration with the Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection and local health departments, is investigating cases of Salmonella infections associated with shelled peas sold at Wisconsin farmers markets. 

The investigation shows that at least six people were infected with the same strain of Salmonella bacteria after purchasing shelled peas produced by Green Barn Farm Market of Ripon, WI.  

The peas were sold at Green Barn Farm Market farm stands and farmers markets in Ripon, Green Bay, Madison, and Fond du Lac, as well as Green Valley Acres Farm and Company farm stand in Neenah.

Shelled peas are loose, no longer in their pods.

Anyone who purchased shelled (loose) peas from Green Barn Farm Market or Green Valley Acres Farm since July 1, 2022, is advised to not eat them and to throw them away, even if the peas have been frozen. 

This investigation is ongoing.

About Salmonella infections
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has come in contact with the shelled peas and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

Some people get infected without getting sick or showing any symptoms. However, they may still spread the infections to others.

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