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Push to Facilitate Liquidity in Private Companies


What do founders, employees and investors in privately held companies all have in common?  Limited opportunity to sell their shares.  That’s because of various legal, contractual and market factors that impede the sale of such securities, so liquidity is usually limited to acquisition of or public offering by the company. In recent years, there’s been a push to facilitate secondary market trading of private securities, and the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Small Business Capital Formation Advisory Committee has scheduled a meeting for August 2 to discuss how to improve liquidity in private companies.

So what are those legal, contractual and market impediments?

Securities Laws

All sales of securities in the United States, whether by companies in primary offerings or by shareholders in secondary offerings, must either be registered with the SEC or satisfy the requirements for an exemption from registration.  With rare exceptions (basically resales by institutional investors (e.g., venture capital funds) with leverage to negotiate registration rights in advance), SEC registration is too expensive and time consuming to be a viable alternative.

The most obvious resale exemption is under Section 4(a)(1) of the Securities Act of 1933 for sales by anyone other than an issuer, underwriter or dealer.  A founder, employee or investor is clearly not an issuer, and would not be deemed a dealer so long as he or she isn’t buying and selling securities as a business.  The real issue is whether the seller is an “underwriter”, broadly defined as anyone who has “purchased from an issuer with a view to … the distribution of any security”.

Because of the ambiguity in the definition of “underwriter”, the SEC promulgated Rule 144, a safe harbor, meaning if the specific requirements of the rule are satisfied the seller will not be deemed to be an underwriter for the purpose of Section 4(a)(1).  The rule applies differently to different sellers, depending on whether or not they are affiliates of the issuer and depending on whether the issuer is an SEC reporting company.  A non-affiliate seller need only satisfy the holding period, which for restricted securities is six months for shares in a reporting company and one year for a non-reporting company.  An affiliate, on the other hand, must satisfy the holding period, volume limitation, manner of sale and information requirements.

Contractual Restrictions

Private issuers typically require shareholders to sign agreements containing various restrictions on transfer.  These may include prohibitions on transferring shares without company consent, rights of first refusal in favor of other shareholders and/or the issuer and tag along or co-sale rights in favor of other investors allowing them to sell their shares pro rata with any sale by the shareholder.  Many companies also impose restrictions on insiders selling shares while in possession of material non-public information.  Any Seller seeking to comply with such insider trading restrictions by providing company information to a buyer would need to be mindful of impediments under confidentiality agreements.  In addition to making it harder to sell, these contractual restrictions tend to depress price for selling holders and increase cost for companies, which must monitor compliance with applicable law, gather and provide information, review transfer documentation and provide legal opinions.

Market Factors

Despite the proliferation of funding portals and other platforms for issuers and investors to find each other, secondary markets remain underdeveloped.  Much of that I suspect has to do with the lack of transparency in secondary market transactions.  As I mention above, non-affiliates selling under Rule 144 need not satisfy the rule’s information requirement.  That’s good for the seller, but the lack of transparency makes the shares less attractive to potential buyers.  Even if a seller would be inclined to volunteer company information, his ability to do so would largely depend on the company’s willingness to cooperate in providing the information and waiving disclosure restrictions.

Small Business Capital Formation Advisory Committee

The SEC’s Small Business Capital Formation Advisory Committee last week released the agenda for its virtual meeting on Aug. 2, which will address liquidity challenges for investors in private companies.  Under the released agenda, the Committee will explore (i) what exit opportunities exist for investors in Regulation A and Regulation Crowdfunding deals where the companies continue to provide ongoing reports, (ii) what secondary market liquidity challenges private and smaller public companies and their investors encounter, and (iii) what changes could help facilitate secondary liquidity for these investors.



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