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Prime Minister could ditch plans to restrict HFSS ads


Liz Truss
Liz Truss.
// The UK government may scrap anti-obesity strategies and cancel planned restrictions on HFSS ads
// The review of HFSS restrictions comes as part of Prime Minister Liz Truss’ goal to reduce burdens on businesses

The UK government may ditch its anti-obesity strategies after ministers ordered a review of measures designed to discourage people from eating junk food.

Earlier this year, the government announced plans to ban pre-9pm ads promoting food and drink high in fat, salt or sugar (HFSS).

The review of HFSS restrictions comes as part of Prime Minister Liz Truss’ goal to reduce burdens on businesses and support shoppers amid the cost-of-living crisis, The Guardian reported.


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The review, which was launched by the Treasury, aims to cut red tape in the cost-of-living crisis and the move could lead to junk food policies being cancelled or revoked.

The pledge to end buy-one-get-one-free and ‘3 for 2’ deals on high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) food and drink in October 2023, which had already been delayed by a year, is likely to be under review.

The January 2024 scheduled ban on junk food TV ads before the 9pm watershed and online, which was also delayed, is also expected to be part of the review.

It is said that officials at the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities are “aghast” at the prospect of the new prime minister scrapping plans to battle junk food consumption.



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