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Automotive

A look into the ‘Roaring ’20s’ companion marques


This unrestored 1928 Wolverine marked the final months of a two-year model run for REO. It was one of many companion cars that dotted the car industry in the late 1920s.

This unrestored 1928 Wolverine marked the final months of a two-year model run for REO. It was one of many companion cars that dotted the car industry in the late 1920s.

There was a time before World War II when car companies binged on a trend toward companion cars. That binge reflected the sometimes up-and-down nature of the car-selling business, and the volatility of the economy in which new cars were sold.

The 1920s was not an easy decade for the car industry in America or, for that matter, the world. After the 1918 armistice ending the Great World War, a glut of soldiers returned to peacetime America, hoping to reclaim their jobs. A good number did, but others found that their jobs had changed, been eliminated or were filled by others. The economy took a real jolt when military contracts were suddenly nulled. Social and economic chaos resulted. At times like that, buyers tend not to purchase a new car. The decade known as the “Roaring Twenties” were just that in the dawning years of the decade; the “roaring” was a series of threats and dangers that undermined the production and financial progress in industrial America.





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